Keyword Analysis & Research: synchronous orbit astronomy definition

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What are synchronous orbits used for?

Much more commonly, synchronous orbits are employed by artificial satellites used for communication, such as geostationary satellites. For natural satellites, which can attain a synchronous orbit only by tidally locking their parent body, it always goes in hand with synchronous rotation of the satellite.

What is synchronous rotation?

Synchronous rotation, also known as captured rotation or tidal locking, is a physical phenomenon in astronomy where a smaller body orbiting another rotates on its own axis in roughly the same amount of time it takes to complete one orbit around the larger body. This causes one side of the orbiting satellite to always face the body it is orbiting.

Is the Moon's orbit synchronous?

The Moon's orbit is largely synchronous, but not perfectly so. Synchronous rotation, also known as captured rotation or tidal locking, is a physical phenomenon in astronomy where a smaller body orbiting another rotates on its own axis in roughly the same amount of time it takes to complete one orbit around the larger body.

What is the difference between a sun-synchronous and a non-sun synchronous orbit?

A non-Sun-synchronous orbit (magenta) is also shown for reference. Dates are shown in white: day/month. A Sun-synchronous orbit ( SSO, also called a heliosynchronous orbit) is a nearly polar orbit around a planet, in which the satellite passes over any given point of the planet's surface at the same local mean solar time.


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